CMMI Institute Partner

Presentations

A Practical Approach To Defining Useful Measures

Being effective in today's business and project environments requires that decisions be made quickly based on the best information available. Organizations face decisions like:

  • How many changes to the requirements can a project handle without slipping?
  • What improvement initiative is providing the best result?
  • Which projects should be funded?
  • Will we be shipping the products we promised on time this quarter?

Project teams are concerned about issues such as their ability to meet schedules with all customer requirements satisfied. In this presentation, participants will learn a practical and structured method for defining measures that help with their decision-making.

This presentation is available for download from Scribd and SlideShare.

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Improving your Risk Identification and Management Approach

Risk management is a continuous, forward-looking process that is an important part of managing a project. Risk management should address issues that could endanger the achievement of critical project objectives. However, there are a number of consequences if you do not have a proper strategy for identifying and managing project and product risks:

  • It is easy to ignore risks when they are not properly identified, documented, or tracked
  • Risks that are known to project staff are often not known to management
  • Repeated project failures due to unforeseen (but predictable) risks can cost you business

This presentation will provide some practical and easy method(s) for systematically identifying risk types, categories, priorities, and impacts that will help you improve how you manage risks over the life of the project.
This presentation is available for download from Scribd and SlideShare.

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Managing Cultural Change

Change is disruptive. Whether you are making changes resulting from audit or appraisal findings, lessons learned, or external innovations there will be disruptions to the status quo. Some people will support the changes, some will wait and see what happens, and others will resist any change. Being aware of the pitfalls associated with changing an organization's culture will greatly aid the success of any Process Improvement program.

This presentation is available for download from Scribd and SlideShare.

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The CMMI: It's So Much More Than Merely Improving Software Processes

The Software Engineering Institute (SEI) has been in the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) business since the late 80s. Resulting from the success of the Software CMM, in the 90s other CMMs began to proliferate. Rather than create and maintain a family of similar models, the SEI elected to combine several bodies of knowledge (Project Management, Systems Engineering, Software Engineering, Acquisition, Services, etc.) into one model framework, the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) released in December 2000.

The CMMI describes best practices for the development and maintenance of products and services across the entire life cycle. By integrating essential bodies of knowledge, the CMMI provides a single, comprehensive framework for organizations to assess their development and maintenance processes, implement improvements, and measure progress. This presentation provides a high level overview of the CMMI and its applicability to hardware development, systems engineering, software engineering, and/or acquisition organizations, benefits realized by organizations implementing the CMMI, and data demonstrating its international acceptance.

This presentation is available for download from Scribd and SlideShare.

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Beating the Odds – A Tale of One Company's Rapid Rise to Maturity Level 5

While implementing the CMMI at Maturity Levels 2 and 3 usually contributes to some level of improved performance, successfully implementing Maturity Level 5 enables an organization to begin to truly optimize their performance. This distinction is even more noteworthy when an organization matures rapidly. A division of a large international systems integration company headquartered in Seoul, South Korea (LG CNS, LG Insurance Sector) reached this pinnacle in October 2005 having successfully reached Maturity Level 5 after achieving Maturity Level 3 just twelve months earlier. Though this speedy rise through the Maturity Levels can not be accomplished by everyone, there are certain attributes, practices, and lessons learned that can be applied to any organization seeking to manage change, improve processes, and rapidly transform performance.

This presentation is available for download from Scribd and SlideShare.

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LG CNS Video about their journey from Maturity Level 3 to 5 (in Korean)

LG CNS Video (in Korean) about their Maturity Level 3 effort